Spanish Saying of the Day: De tal palo, tal astilla



Spanish saying "De tal palo, tal astilla". Visit www.soeasyspanish.com







“De tal palo, tal astilla”











This Spanish saying is used to refer to members of the same family, usually stating similarity between father/mother and son/daughter. The equivalent English saying is almost a literal translation: “A chip off the old block”. It can also be translated as “Like father, like son” or “Like mother, like daughter”.



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Spanish Saying of the Day: Primavera mojada, verano seco


Spanish sayings. Visit www.soeasyspanish.com






"Primavera mojada, verano seco"













This Spanish saying refers to the weather, as many old sayings do. It is supposed that if the spring is rainy, summer will be dry. Since in many places winter has been very wet, most of all want a dry spring, don’t we? Let’s see what will happen!


Glossary:

Primavera: spring.

Lluvioso(a): rainy.

Mojado(a)/ húmedo(a): wet.

Seco(a): dry.

Verano: summer.


Check out the four seasons in Spanish with translated sentences.




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Spanish weather expressions with audio


Spanish weather expressions. Visit www.soeasyspanish.com





Spanish weather expressions are not translated literally. Do you want to learn what verbs are used?










In weather expressions, the verb to be is translated as hacerIt is not a literal translation, because the verb hacer means to do/to make. The verb estar is used when there is an adjective.


Hace frío.                                          It’s cold.

Hace mucho calor.                              It’s very hot.

Está nublado.                                     It’s cloudy.


Note that the pronoun it is not translated. There is no subject neuter pronoun in Spanish. Find out more on weather expressions and vocabulary in the impersonal sentences chapter.


Similarly, to express how you feel about the weather, the verb to be is translated as tener. Tener usually means to have.


Tengo mucho frío.                              I’m very cold.

¿Tienes calor?                                     Are you hot?


These sentences are not impersonal.



More sentences (audio):


En invierno hace mucho frío.               It’s very cold in winter.

Llueve / está lloviendo.                       It’s raining.

Hace sol / está soleado.                      It’s sunny.

Hace fresco.                                       It’s cool.

El cielo está despejado.                      The sky is clear.



Listen and repeat:


         
 



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Spanish Saying of the Day: No hay mal que por bien no venga.



Spanish saying of the day "No hay mal que por bien no venga". Visit www.soeasyspanish.com







"No hay mal que por bien no venga".











The English equivalent is "Every cloud has a silver lining". It means that every bad situation has a bright side. That is to say, something good will come out of it.


As in last week's saying, today's is not translated literally. "Mal" in this context means "a bad situation, bad thing". "Bien" means "something good".


Did you know that "good and evil" is translated as "el bien y el mal"


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The four seasons in Spanish


The four seasons in Spanish. Visit www.soeasyspanish.com






One of the four seasons in Spanish is feminine. Can you tell which one?









Here is the answer: 

La primavera: spring. 


The other seasons are masculine:

El verano: summer.

El otoño: fall/autumn.

El invierno: winter.



Days and months are masculine. Check out the nouns chapter to learn the general rules of noun gender.


The definite article is widely used with the seasons. It can be omitted sometimes, but it has to be used when there is an adjective or a complement of the noun:


Me gusta el verano.                                     I like summer.

Juan va a venir en (el) otoño.                       Juan will come in fall.

En (el) invierno hace mucho frío.                  It’s very cold in winter.

El invierno pasado hizo mucho frío.              Last winter was very cold.

El próximo verano será caluroso.                  Next summer will be hot.



The indefinite article or a demonstrative can be used to refer to a certain period:


Ha sido un invierno lluvioso.                          It’s been a rainy winter.

Esta primavera es calurosa.                           This spring is being hot.


The seasons can be plural. This is more usual in Spanish than in English:


Odio los inviernos lluviosos.                         I hate rainy winters.


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Spanish Saying of the Day: El tiempo es oro


Spanish saying of the day "El tiempo es oro". Visit www.soeasyspanish.com





"El tiempo es oro"














The English equivalent of this Spanish saying is "Time is money". It means that wasted time costs money. 


As you can see, sayings are not translated literally. Oro means gold. Gold was used as money. It is still considered the most valuable asset.



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Months in Spanish


Months of the year in Spanish. Visit www.soeasyspanish.com





Learn the months of the year with audio.










Spanish            English

enero
January
febrero
February
marzo
March
abril
April
mayo
May
junio
June
julio
July
agosto
August
septiembre
September
octubre
October
noviembre
November
diciembre
December



Listen and repeat:


 


        

Note that:


The months of the year are masculine and not capitalized.


Mi cumpleaños es en abril.                           My birthday is in April.



The article is rarely used with the month.


It is used in the expression “el mes de + (month)”:


El mes de febrero fue el más lluvioso del año.

February was the wettest month of the year.



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